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Why should you vote for Resonance? From Miami Beach, FL, Radhika explains why it’s a good idea. Vote for Resonance: www.brandnewunsigned.mtv.co.uk/act/resonance

Resonance has been shortlisted for the MTV Brand New Unsigned competition this year! We’ve now made it through to the voting stage, so we’d love your support to make it to the next stage.

Please visit this link (or click on the image below), cast your vote for Resonance, and let MTV know that you’re backing us: www.brandnewunsigned.mtv.co.uk/act/resonance

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With your support, we could be playing that guitar on the MTV.

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Resonance to play legendary Camden venue. Click on the image to read more.

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Resonance recorded a video of the original song ‘Winner’ during a studio rehearsal session.

For months, Radhika had been wanting to capture a live shoot of the band – real music, real video, no staged video footage or overlaid sound. The sound and video recordings in this are 100% live and authentic.

Filming by Adam Batki. Video editing by Radhika.

Click on the image to read the full newsletter.

July Newsletter extract

Earlier this month, Resonance was invited by Vidushi Shanthi Rao to perform during a veena recital in the Jubilee Hall of the Raffles Hotel. Vidushi Shanthi Rao performed segments from the Indian classical repertoire as well as improvised fusion pieces, one of which was Resonance’s blues song ‘Mister Policeman’.

A message from Radhika:

At the EP launch, one of the things I did during our sets, in between songs, was to tell little stories about the songs – how they came about, what guitar they were written on, any funny anecdotes from the studio sessions, etc.

One of our friends said she’d really liked these stories, so I thought I’d tell you more. A poll on social media decided that you wanted to hear about the second track: Release Me from the Dialogue. So here it is!

You can listen to the song below, or at this link: Release Me from the Dialogue on Resonance’s Soundcloud.

 

 

The main riff

The song opens with a riff that’s very calming. When the idea first came through, the riff had a different rhythm: the first note was longer than the second (now it’s the other way around). I would play around with the original idea every now and then, and one time when I picked up the guitar, the riff came out different, with the first note shorter. It was one of those eureka moments, and I was drawn in by the feel it radiated.

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The lyrics

I guess the lyrics are pretty clear, and they’re about something everyone knows first-hand. It’s about that constant dialogue we have with ourselves day to day. ‘Am I doing the right thing? Will this idea ever come together? Did I get my thoughts across in that discussion? Is so-and-so happy/unhappy about x, y, z?’ This dialogue is a kind of noise which, I feel, gets in the way of our clear-thinking selves. The constant assessment, fear and doubt can be paralysing. And it can keep you safely, but painfully, stuck in inaction. And that’s why it’s so attractive – because you don’t have to go out there and do something, feel exposed, try something new.

So the first verse feels like a friend talking to you, telling you that your words don’t have to go so fast, and asking you to find your quietness. And it identifies what the listener (in my case, me) really wants: to hear the song, and to dream free of fear and hesitation. The chorus is me asking to be released from the dialogue.

In the second verse, the Universe takes over the role of the speaker, and it asks me why I have so many questions, when there is so much to be grateful for. No one’s life is perfect or free of pain, but there are so many elements in it that are beautiful. But sometimes we ignore the gifts we have, and we ask questions constantly: why or why not, whether and how something we want is going to fall into place, what it all means, what should we do, where should we go. And we sit with these questions, we have a drink with them, indulge them, and we let them feed off of our power. Not only are we ignoring the gifts – sometimes we actively refute them. This is where the Universe asks a very important question: why do we let other people analyse the gifts the Universe gives us? The Universe can give us music, song, creativity, poetry, the ability to draw or write, or to cook a meal that makes loved ones happy. But instead of relishing those gifts and being simply ecstatic in the pleasure those gifts give us personally, we allow other people to analyse them and take them apart, to judge them. And so many people stop enjoying their gifts because of this. The next lines express the desire, spoken directly to the Universe: “in the day I want to hear your song, in the night I want to dream free. Release me from the dialogue.”

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The guitar parts, and the cello

Carlos suggested that the main riff come back during the chorus. Originally, I had a different guitar part in that section, but he said he felt like hearing the opening riff again. I’m glad we made that change, because now it feels right. Another magical part of the song for me is the part between the end of the first chorus and the start of the second verse. This is still one of my favourite parts to listen to in the whole EP. It’s just magical. Listen to it.

Where did the cello come from? This was quite an exciting thing that came together very close to the actual recording sessions. One morning I was lying in bed, and I was playing the song in my head. And I vividly heard a cello come in and accompany the song, exactly where it does now. I recorded the rough idea on my mobile. Thanks to my sister and her flatmate (thank you, James!), we found a cellist to play on the record with us. Her name is Lorna Davis, and she’s a student at the Royal Academy of Music. I remember the first time I spoke to her on the phone. After our call ended, she called back almost right away and asked if she could come and audition for me! Of course I said yes, because I couldn’t wait to hear an actual cello in my living room! During the recording sessions, she was a lovely presence in the studio. Recording sessions can get intense for me, because I like the freedom of being on stage, and suddenly I’m there in front of a number of highly sensitive microphones in a dark-lit room with no windows, with the whole control room listening to everything I’m saying. And having Lorna join us that day with her beautiful cello was a breath of fresh air.

Thanks to Sahar for the idea of writing this post. I really enjoyed thinking back to where the song came from and to our rehearsals and recording sessions, and I hope all of you who stayed until the end(!) have enjoyed reading about it too.

Love

Radhika

Resonance is looking for a bass player, to play gigs with them and to be involved in future studio recordings. If bass guitar is your instrument, you like Resonance’s sound, and you’re serious about the work but also have a sense of humour, send Radhika an e-mail at readytosayhello@gmail.com. Resonance’s idea of the ideal bass player is someone who speaks few words, but who says a lot.

Radhika was a guest on Croydon Radio yesterday, on Ashley Cowan’s ‘The Alternative Hour’. She talked heart and heartburn with Ashley, played a couple of songs from the new EP, and did a live on-air jam, with fellow guest Malcolm Galloway, of one of Resonance’s blues songs, ‘Chained’. Listen to the podcast here.

‘The Alternative Hour’ streams live on the internet and is broadcast on FM radio in Denmark.

Croydon Radio